After the storm, Philip Guston for real

After the storm, Philip Guston for real

Hauser & Wirth, the gallery that has represented the estate of Philip Guston since 2015, has leapt unto the breach. In lieu of “Philip Guston Now,” the enormous, widely anticipated retrospective set to tour to four museums on both sides of the Atlantic that was abruptly postponed last September, Hauser & Wirth has mounted a powerful exhibition of 18 of the late paintings that are the crowning achievement of abstract expressionism’s greatest apostate. The new show, “Philip Guston, 1969-1979” — organized with cooperation from the Guston Foundation — is divided between two galleries: six paintings from 1969-70 featuring the white-hooded creatures that recall the Ku Klux Klan, and partly caused the postponement;
Hauser & Wirth, the gallery that has represented the estate of Philip Guston since 2015, has leapt unto the breach. In lieu of “Philip Guston Now,” the enormous, widely anticipated retrospective set to tour to four museums on both sides of the Atlantic that was abruptly postponed last September, Hauser & Wirth has mounted a powerful exhibition of 18 of the late paintings that are the crowning achievement of abstract expressionism’s greatest apostate. The new show, “Philip Guston, 1969-1979” — organized with cooperation from the Guston Foundation — is divided between two galleries: six paintings from 1969-70 featuring the white-hooded creatures that recall the Ku Klux Klan, and partly caused the postponement;