At Gagosian, art that reverberates beyond the gallery walls

At Gagosian, art that reverberates beyond the gallery walls

There’s a chill breeze blowing through Gagosian’s West 24th Street galleries this summer in the form of the group show “Social Works,” organized by Antwaun Sargent — curator, critic and author of “The New Black Vanguard: Photography Between Art and Fashion” — in his debut project as a Gagosian director. The 12 artists span generations and formal disciplines. And in the work here, much of it made during the past pandemic-gripped year, they survey some of the wide social landscape encompassed by Black as an identity. Part of the terrain lies in textbook history. The “bitter trade” in Titus Kaphar’s painting of that title is European colonialism and slavery. A turbulently textured wall relief by Allana Clarke, made from rubber and hair-bonding glue and titled “There Was Nothing Left for Us,” suggests a silhouette of continental Africa. Four large abstract collage paintings by architect and social organizer Rick Lowe, of Proj
There’s a chill breeze blowing through Gagosian’s West 24th Street galleries this summer in the form of the group show “Social Works,” organized by Antwaun Sargent — curator, critic and author of “The New Black Vanguard: Photography Between Art and Fashion” — in his debut project as a Gagosian director. The 12 artists span generations and formal disciplines. And in the work here, much of it made during the past pandemic-gripped year, they survey some of the wide social landscape encompassed by Black as an identity. Part of the terrain lies in textbook history. The “bitter trade” in Titus Kaphar’s painting of that title is European colonialism and slavery. A turbulently textured wall relief by Allana Clarke, made from rubber and hair-bonding glue and titled “There Was Nothing Left for Us,” suggests a silhouette of continental Africa. Four large abstract collage paintings by architect and social organizer Rick Lowe, of Proj