Bank of England removes art of leaders linked to slave trade

Bank of England removes art of leaders linked to slave trade

The Bank of England has stopped displaying art depicting several former governors and directors after a review found they were connected to the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Oil paintings and busts of seven leading figures at the central bank between 1698 and 1814 — James Bateman, Robert Bristow, Robert Clayton, William Dawsonne, Gilbert Heathcote, William Manning and John Pearse — have been removed after it was established they had links to slavery, the bank said in a statement Friday. The move was the latest in a difficult reckoning taking place at museums, galleries and long-standing institutions in Britain and other European countries that have begun reframing their exhibitions to more explicitly acknowledge links to slavery and colonialism. Criticism that many had not done enough escalated after the Black Lives Matter protests around the world last summer following the murder of George Floyd by a police officer in the United States. The British Museum in London last year a
The Bank of England has stopped displaying art depicting several former governors and directors after a review found they were connected to the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Oil paintings and busts of seven leading figures at the central bank between 1698 and 1814 — James Bateman, Robert Bristow, Robert Clayton, William Dawsonne, Gilbert Heathcote, William Manning and John Pearse — have been removed after it was established they had links to slavery, the bank said in a statement Friday. The move was the latest in a difficult reckoning taking place at museums, galleries and long-standing institutions in Britain and other European countries that have begun reframing their exhibitions to more explicitly acknowledge links to slavery and colonialism. Criticism that many had not done enough escalated after the Black Lives Matter protests around the world last summer following the murder of George Floyd by a police officer in the United States. The British Museum in London last year a