Discovery at the National Museum of Norway reveals unknown underdrawings in Edvard Munch’s Madonna

Discovery at the National Museum of Norway reveals unknown underdrawings in Edvard Munch’s Madonna

Previously unknown underdrawings have been uncovered in one of Edvard Munch’s most famous paintings, Madonna. The discovery was made by conservator Thierry Ford and photographer Børre Høstland at the National Museum of Norway using infrared reflectography, a technique that allows conservators to see underlayers beneath the surface of paintings. Madonna has undergone research and conservation in preparation of going on display in the Munch Room in the National Museum’s new building, which opens in Oslo 11 June 2022. The painting depicts a woman arching her back, with one arm behind her head and the other behind her back. The underdrawings reveal that Munch attempted a different composition before finally settling with the position of the arms that he used for later Madonna paintings. Edvard Munch painted five similar-sized versions of Madonna between 1894 and 1897. None of the paintings
Previously unknown underdrawings have been uncovered in one of Edvard Munch’s most famous paintings, Madonna. The discovery was made by conservator Thierry Ford and photographer Børre Høstland at the National Museum of Norway using infrared reflectography, a technique that allows conservators to see underlayers beneath the surface of paintings. Madonna has undergone research and conservation in preparation of going on display in the Munch Room in the National Museum’s new building, which opens in Oslo 11 June 2022. The painting depicts a woman arching her back, with one arm behind her head and the other behind her back. The underdrawings reveal that Munch attempted a different composition before finally settling with the position of the arms that he used for later Madonna paintings. Edvard Munch painted five similar-sized versions of Madonna between 1894 and 1897. None of the paintings