Egypt dig uncovers 2,300-year-old settlement in Alexandria

Egypt dig uncovers 2,300-year-old settlement in Alexandria

Egypt on Friday announced the discovery of a settlement in the Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria dating back to at least the second century BC. An Egyptian archaeological team made the find in the city’s central Al-Shatby district during nine months of excavations, a statement from the tourism and antiquities ministry said. The settlement had a “residential and commercial” function, the statement said. The head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa Waziri, said initial studies showed “a main road and adjacent streets linked by a sewage network”. The area was in use from the late Ptolemaic period until the middle of the period of Roman rule, covering a timeframe from “the second century BC until the fourth century AD,” Waziri was quoted as saying. Archaeologists discovered a large number of wells cut into the rock and a network of water cisterns, the statement said.
Egypt on Friday announced the discovery of a settlement in the Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria dating back to at least the second century BC. An Egyptian archaeological team made the find in the city’s central Al-Shatby district during nine months of excavations, a statement from the tourism and antiquities ministry said. The settlement had a “residential and commercial” function, the statement said. The head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa Waziri, said initial studies showed “a main road and adjacent streets linked by a sewage network”. The area was in use from the late Ptolemaic period until the middle of the period of Roman rule, covering a timeframe from “the second century BC until the fourth century AD,” Waziri was quoted as saying. Archaeologists discovered a large number of wells cut into the rock and a network of water cisterns, the statement said.