Frick publication provides new insights on innovative fourteenth-century Venetian artist

Frick publication provides new insights on innovative fourteenth-century Venetian artist

Traditionally thought of as the father of Venetian painting, Paolo Veneziano (ca. 1295–1362) established the city’s reputation for excellence in this medium, and his achievements have long been celebrated by scholars. Nonetheless, Paolo’s work has received little attention outside of Italy. The publication Paolo Veneziano: Art & Devotion in 14th-Century Venice examines the long-dispersed panels of two of Paolo’s rare surviving altarpieces, along with other works by the artist and contemporaneous pieces in various media. Considered together, they offer new insights into Paolo’s practice and achievements. The authors also examine how the artist’s innovative and intricate work both reflected and engaged with advances in manuscript illumination, ivory carving, textile production, and metalwork. The lead authors are Laura Llewellyn (Associate Curator of Renaissance
Traditionally thought of as the father of Venetian painting, Paolo Veneziano (ca. 1295–1362) established the city’s reputation for excellence in this medium, and his achievements have long been celebrated by scholars. Nonetheless, Paolo’s work has received little attention outside of Italy. The publication Paolo Veneziano: Art & Devotion in 14th-Century Venice examines the long-dispersed panels of two of Paolo’s rare surviving altarpieces, along with other works by the artist and contemporaneous pieces in various media. Considered together, they offer new insights into Paolo’s practice and achievements. The authors also examine how the artist’s innovative and intricate work both reflected and engaged with advances in manuscript illumination, ivory carving, textile production, and metalwork. The lead authors are Laura Llewellyn (Associate Curator of Renaissance