‘Gender alchemy’ is transforming art for the 21st century

‘Gender alchemy’ is transforming art for the 21st century

Organizing a museum survey of feminist art can be as politically fraught as organizing a women’s march, for some of the same reasons. Different women are bound to have different political goals or priorities. There are competing theoretical frameworks, from Marxist feminism, which sees capitalism as the main source of women’s oppression, to the intersectional feminism so prominent today, which highlights the impact of factors such as race and class on women’s lives. And the very notion of what it means to be a woman is fast evolving, with the growing visibility of gender-fluid, nonbinary and transgender populations. But curators at two California museums have jumped in, organizing independent exhibitions that, taken together, reflect what feminist art today looks like — and the most urgent issues it looks
Organizing a museum survey of feminist art can be as politically fraught as organizing a women’s march, for some of the same reasons. Different women are bound to have different political goals or priorities. There are competing theoretical frameworks, from Marxist feminism, which sees capitalism as the main source of women’s oppression, to the intersectional feminism so prominent today, which highlights the impact of factors such as race and class on women’s lives. And the very notion of what it means to be a woman is fast evolving, with the growing visibility of gender-fluid, nonbinary and transgender populations. But curators at two California museums have jumped in, organizing independent exhibitions that, taken together, reflect what feminist art today looks like — and the most urgent issues it looks