Joe Minter hears the bulldozer coming. Will his artwork be saved?

Joe Minter hears the bulldozer coming. Will his artwork be saved?

“I’m the conjurer of all my ancestors, 400 years of African people in America,” said Joe Minter, surveying the dense outdoor environment of artworks he has forged from refuse over the past 32 years across his half-acre yard, facing two of the largest African American cemeteries in the South. Nodding to the tombstones, he added, “they have given me the privilege of being their spokesman.” Minter described receiving the word of God in 1989 to “pick up what has been thrown away, put it together and put my words on it.” Ever since, the artist, now 78, with a gift for mechanics and previous jobs in construction and auto repair, has been building
“I’m the conjurer of all my ancestors, 400 years of African people in America,” said Joe Minter, surveying the dense outdoor environment of artworks he has forged from refuse over the past 32 years across his half-acre yard, facing two of the largest African American cemeteries in the South. Nodding to the tombstones, he added, “they have given me the privilege of being their spokesman.” Minter described receiving the word of God in 1989 to “pick up what has been thrown away, put it together and put my words on it.” Ever since, the artist, now 78, with a gift for mechanics and previous jobs in construction and auto repair, has been building