Louise Fishman, who gave abstract expressionism a new tone, dies at 82

Louise Fishman, who gave abstract expressionism a new tone, dies at 82

Louise Fishman, a widely exhibited artist who imbued her abstract expressionist paintings and other works with elements of feminism and gay and Jewish identity, died July 26 in the New York City borough of Manhattan. She was 82. Her spouse, Ingrid Nyeboe, said the cause was complications of an ablation, a heart procedure. Fishman continually explored new themes and techniques, usually giving her own spin to the male-dominated genre of abstract expressionism. She was influenced early in her career by the first-generation abstract expressionists, men from the Jackson Pollock era, but by the mid-1960s she began to immerse herself in the gay and feminist movements, joining protest organizations like WITCH — the Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy From Hell — and sharing
Louise Fishman, a widely exhibited artist who imbued her abstract expressionist paintings and other works with elements of feminism and gay and Jewish identity, died July 26 in the New York City borough of Manhattan. She was 82. Her spouse, Ingrid Nyeboe, said the cause was complications of an ablation, a heart procedure. Fishman continually explored new themes and techniques, usually giving her own spin to the male-dominated genre of abstract expressionism. She was influenced early in her career by the first-generation abstract expressionists, men from the Jackson Pollock era, but by the mid-1960s she began to immerse herself in the gay and feminist movements, joining protest organizations like WITCH — the Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy From Hell — and sharing