The artistic aromas of Anicka Yi

The artistic aromas of Anicka Yi

Six years ago, artist Anicka Yi created an exhibition on a theme that now feels eerily prescient: human fears of viral contagion. After an ebola case was confirmed in New York, unsettling city life and causing months of anxiety, Yi set up tents at The Kitchen arts venue in New York City to display petri dishes containing bacteria she had gathered from 100 women. For Yi, 50, the germs and microbes that pass between us are key to understanding how humans respond to one another. And the air that we breathe is where much of this molecular exchange takes place. Now as she takes over Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in London for a solo presentation running from Tuesday through Jan. 16, 2022, Yi has made air her primary material and subject. When visitors enter the cavernous, industrial hall, they will encounter
Six years ago, artist Anicka Yi created an exhibition on a theme that now feels eerily prescient: human fears of viral contagion. After an ebola case was confirmed in New York, unsettling city life and causing months of anxiety, Yi set up tents at The Kitchen arts venue in New York City to display petri dishes containing bacteria she had gathered from 100 women. For Yi, 50, the germs and microbes that pass between us are key to understanding how humans respond to one another. And the air that we breathe is where much of this molecular exchange takes place. Now as she takes over Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in London for a solo presentation running from Tuesday through Jan. 16, 2022, Yi has made air her primary material and subject. When visitors enter the cavernous, industrial hall, they will encounter