50 years of taking photography seriously

50 years of taking photography seriously

In 1968, Sue Davies was working as a secretary at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in the British capital when a colleague got sick, and she found herself left to finish off a photography show they had been working on. The exhibition, held the following year and focused on images of women, was a hit. Visitors lined up down the block to get in, and Davies asked the institute’s founders if they would consider showing more photography. The response, she said, was not what she had wanted: They had only commissioned the last show, they told her, because they were offered the pictures for free. That made Davies lose her temper, she later told The British Journal of Photography. So she made a decision: If museums didn’t want photography in their spaces, she would start her own. Three years later, in January 1971, Davies opened the Photographers’ Gallery in a former tearoom in the West End of London. It was the city’s first exhibition space dedicated to photography; its aim, D
In 1968, Sue Davies was working as a secretary at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in the British capital when a colleague got sick, and she found herself left to finish off a photography show they had been working on. The exhibition, held the following year and focused on images of women, was a hit. Visitors lined up down the block to get in, and Davies asked the institute’s founders if they would consider showing more photography. The response, she said, was not what she had wanted: They had only commissioned the last show, they told her, because they were offered the pictures for free. That made Davies lose her temper, she later told The British Journal of Photography. So she made a decision: If museums didn’t want photography in their spaces, she would start her own. Three years later, in January 1971, Davies opened the Photographers’ Gallery in a former tearoom in the West End of London. It was the city’s first exhibition space dedicated to photography; its aim, D