A 6-year refit winds back the clock at a Berlin landmark

A 6-year refit winds back the clock at a Berlin landmark

The renovations took six years and cost $165 million, but what impressed Julia Büttelmann when she visited the Neue Nationalgalerie on Sunday was that nothing seemed to have changed. “It just reminds me so much of West Berlin,” said Büttelmann, 60, of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s temple of modern art, which stood just a few hundred yards from the wall dividing the city when she first visited as a teenager in the 1970s. “It’s like a time capsule,” she added. Büttelmann was one of the first 1,500 Berliners who had reserved tickets two weeks in advance and donned medical-grade masks to rediscover this city landmark, which had become a little worn before the renovation: Its carpets were threadbare, its upholstery was frayed and the huge windows of its main hall fogged up in cold weather. “Carrying out such a task, in a building that leaves no place to hide, is daunting,” David Chipperfield, a British architect whose studio oversaw the renovations, said
The renovations took six years and cost $165 million, but what impressed Julia Büttelmann when she visited the Neue Nationalgalerie on Sunday was that nothing seemed to have changed. “It just reminds me so much of West Berlin,” said Büttelmann, 60, of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s temple of modern art, which stood just a few hundred yards from the wall dividing the city when she first visited as a teenager in the 1970s. “It’s like a time capsule,” she added. Büttelmann was one of the first 1,500 Berliners who had reserved tickets two weeks in advance and donned medical-grade masks to rediscover this city landmark, which had become a little worn before the renovation: Its carpets were threadbare, its upholstery was frayed and the huge windows of its main hall fogged up in cold weather. “Carrying out such a task, in a building that leaves no place to hide, is daunting,” David Chipperfield, a British architect whose studio oversaw the renovations, said