A Fellini museum, as lavish as his movies

A Fellini museum, as lavish as his movies

Federico Fellini is one of a select group of movie directors to have gotten an Oxford English Dictionary-sanctioned adjective: “Felliniesque,” which is defined as “fantastic, bizarre; lavish, extravagant.” That description could easily apply to the Fellini Museum, which opened in the Italian coast city of Rimini — the director’s birthplace — earlier this month: a multimedia project that draws visitors into Fellini’s idiosyncratic cinematic universe. The museum is at turns fantastic (pages from the so-called “Book of Dreams,” Fellini’s drawings and musings on his nighttime reveries, appear on a wall when visitors blow on a feather); lavish (it includes outlandish costumes from the liturgical fashion show in his 1972 film “Roma”); and bizarre (what to make of a gigantic plush sculpture of actress Anita Ekberg, which visitors can recline on to watch
Federico Fellini is one of a select group of movie directors to have gotten an Oxford English Dictionary-sanctioned adjective: “Felliniesque,” which is defined as “fantastic, bizarre; lavish, extravagant.” That description could easily apply to the Fellini Museum, which opened in the Italian coast city of Rimini — the director’s birthplace — earlier this month: a multimedia project that draws visitors into Fellini’s idiosyncratic cinematic universe. The museum is at turns fantastic (pages from the so-called “Book of Dreams,” Fellini’s drawings and musings on his nighttime reveries, appear on a wall when visitors blow on a feather); lavish (it includes outlandish costumes from the liturgical fashion show in his 1972 film “Roma”); and bizarre (what to make of a gigantic plush sculpture of actress Anita Ekberg, which visitors can recline on to watch