At Frieze London, the art world inches toward normalcy

At Frieze London, the art world inches toward normalcy

It was “business as usual,” Russian art adviser and collector Alex Lachmann said Wednesday, as he made his way through the crowd of VIPs at the opening of the first in-person Frieze London art fair since October 2019. Then, he raised a finger and added, “almost.” This week, the long-postponed live editions of the Frieze London and Frieze Masters fairs, featuring 279 dealers inside huge tents in Regent’s Park, followed last month’s Art Basel as the international art trade attempts a return to pre-pandemic normalcy. Frieze New York returned to a live format in May, albeit on a reduced scale. In London, Frieze visitors were required to wear wristbands proving COVID-19 vaccination. They were also required to wear masks, but many didn’t, and enforcement was lax. Dating to 1993, “Frieze Week” is traditionally the moment when London hosts the international art world’s most compelling, must-get-on-a-plane mix of fairs, museum shows, auctions an
It was “business as usual,” Russian art adviser and collector Alex Lachmann said Wednesday, as he made his way through the crowd of VIPs at the opening of the first in-person Frieze London art fair since October 2019. Then, he raised a finger and added, “almost.” This week, the long-postponed live editions of the Frieze London and Frieze Masters fairs, featuring 279 dealers inside huge tents in Regent’s Park, followed last month’s Art Basel as the international art trade attempts a return to pre-pandemic normalcy. Frieze New York returned to a live format in May, albeit on a reduced scale. In London, Frieze visitors were required to wear wristbands proving COVID-19 vaccination. They were also required to wear masks, but many didn’t, and enforcement was lax. Dating to 1993, “Frieze Week” is traditionally the moment when London hosts the international art world’s most compelling, must-get-on-a-plane mix of fairs, museum shows, auctions an