Exhibition reveals the life, genius and legacy of the ‘Michelangelo of Wood’

Exhibition reveals the life, genius and legacy of the ‘Michelangelo of Wood’

The remarkable life and legacy of Grinling Gibbons (1648-1721) is being celebrated at Compton Verney, as part of a year-long series of events to commemorate the tercentenary of the most renowned British woodcarver of the 17th century, often called the ‘Michelangelo of Wood.’ The exhibition, Centuries in the Making – produced in partnership with the Grinling Gibbons Society – reveals the life, genius and legacy of this legendary sculptor and craftsman, who died on 3 August 1721. Arguably the greatest carver in British history, Grinling Gibbons’ legacy over the past 300 years has been to inspire craftsmanship and carving from his contemporaries to modern-day makers. Gibbons remains a potent symbol of inspiration and achievement. He carved with an unsurpassed realism that could literally fool the eye. A fine example of which is a limewood cravat (c.1690, V&A) once owned by Sir Horace Walpole. Exquisitely carved
The remarkable life and legacy of Grinling Gibbons (1648-1721) is being celebrated at Compton Verney, as part of a year-long series of events to commemorate the tercentenary of the most renowned British woodcarver of the 17th century, often called the ‘Michelangelo of Wood.’ The exhibition, Centuries in the Making – produced in partnership with the Grinling Gibbons Society – reveals the life, genius and legacy of this legendary sculptor and craftsman, who died on 3 August 1721. Arguably the greatest carver in British history, Grinling Gibbons’ legacy over the past 300 years has been to inspire craftsmanship and carving from his contemporaries to modern-day makers. Gibbons remains a potent symbol of inspiration and achievement. He carved with an unsurpassed realism that could literally fool the eye. A fine example of which is a limewood cravat (c.1690, V&A) once owned by Sir Horace Walpole. Exquisitely carved