Judy Chicago celebrated in Nevada Museum of Art exhibition

Judy Chicago celebrated in Nevada Museum of Art exhibition

Beginning in 1968, artist Judy Chicago embarked on a series of ephemeral Atmospheres performances in the deserts of the American West, using colored smoke and fireworks to “soften that macho Land Art scene.” Long overlooked by art historians and scholars, Chicago’s Atmospheres series can now be viewed as one of the most noteworthy responses to the monumental landscape interventions of artists such as Michael Heizer and Robert Smithson, effected at virtually the same moment. With Chicago continuing this vein into the present, working with a pyrotechnic team including sixth-generation Pyro Spectaculars member Chris Souza and her photographer husband Donald Woodman, the series now stands as a long-running tradition within her body of work. In 2018, the Nevada Museum of Art’s Center for Art + Environment acquired Judy
Beginning in 1968, artist Judy Chicago embarked on a series of ephemeral Atmospheres performances in the deserts of the American West, using colored smoke and fireworks to “soften that macho Land Art scene.” Long overlooked by art historians and scholars, Chicago’s Atmospheres series can now be viewed as one of the most noteworthy responses to the monumental landscape interventions of artists such as Michael Heizer and Robert Smithson, effected at virtually the same moment. With Chicago continuing this vein into the present, working with a pyrotechnic team including sixth-generation Pyro Spectaculars member Chris Souza and her photographer husband Donald Woodman, the series now stands as a long-running tradition within her body of work. In 2018, the Nevada Museum of Art’s Center for Art + Environment acquired Judy