Max Liebermann’s heirs compensated for Nazi-looted painting

Max Liebermann’s heirs compensated for Nazi-looted painting

A decadelong dispute over a portrait of Max Liebermann’s wife, painted by the German impressionist himself, and confiscated by the Nazis from her home here in 1943, has been settled with a financial payment to the artist’s heirs. In a joint statement with the heirs, the Georg Schäfer Foundation, which came to own the 1930 portrait and two other works from Liebermann’s collection, said an anonymous private donor agreed to pay an undisclosed amount to the heirs in compensation for the three works. The settlement aims “to treat the historical facts truthfully and with dignity” and solve “the dilemma between applicable law on the one hand and moral claims and justice on the other,” the statement said. It includes an agreement that the provenance of the works will be clearly displayed in the Georg Schäfer Museum in Schweinfurt in northern
A decadelong dispute over a portrait of Max Liebermann’s wife, painted by the German impressionist himself, and confiscated by the Nazis from her home here in 1943, has been settled with a financial payment to the artist’s heirs. In a joint statement with the heirs, the Georg Schäfer Foundation, which came to own the 1930 portrait and two other works from Liebermann’s collection, said an anonymous private donor agreed to pay an undisclosed amount to the heirs in compensation for the three works. The settlement aims “to treat the historical facts truthfully and with dignity” and solve “the dilemma between applicable law on the one hand and moral claims and justice on the other,” the statement said. It includes an agreement that the provenance of the works will be clearly displayed in the Georg Schäfer Museum in Schweinfurt in northern