Michel Laclotte, who ‘created the modern Louvre,’ dies at 91

Michel Laclotte, who ‘created the modern Louvre,’ dies at 91

Michel Laclotte, who as director of the Louvre oversaw much of its historic renovations, and who earlier, as its chief curator of paintings, championed the Musée D’Orsay (the museum-in-a-train-station) and I.M. Pei’s glass pyramid at the Louvre — two of the most controversial but ultimately beloved architectural projects of late 20th-century Paris — died Aug. 10 in Montauban, in southern France. He was 91. Pierre Rosenberg, Laclotte’s successor at the Louvre, confirmed the death, at a friend’s home. No cause was given. Laclotte went to battle for the Musée D’Orsay in 1972, after the French government had demolished the centuries-old market buildings at Les Halles. That had ignited a zeal for preservation in Paris rivaling that in New York City almost a decade earlier, when the old Penn Station, a beaux-arts landmark, was destroyed. The Gare d’Orsay, a decommissioned train station
Michel Laclotte, who as director of the Louvre oversaw much of its historic renovations, and who earlier, as its chief curator of paintings, championed the Musée D’Orsay (the museum-in-a-train-station) and I.M. Pei’s glass pyramid at the Louvre — two of the most controversial but ultimately beloved architectural projects of late 20th-century Paris — died Aug. 10 in Montauban, in southern France. He was 91. Pierre Rosenberg, Laclotte’s successor at the Louvre, confirmed the death, at a friend’s home. No cause was given. Laclotte went to battle for the Musée D’Orsay in 1972, after the French government had demolished the centuries-old market buildings at Les Halles. That had ignited a zeal for preservation in Paris rivaling that in New York City almost a decade earlier, when the old Penn Station, a beaux-arts landmark, was destroyed. The Gare d’Orsay, a decommissioned train station