Pearl Tytell, examiner of dubious documents, dies at 104

Pearl Tytell, examiner of dubious documents, dies at 104

Pearl Tytell, the matriarch of a family of questioned-document examiners whose intricate knowledge of paper, ink, handwriting and typewriters made her a prominent investigator of frauds, forgeries, tax evasion and poison-pen letters, died Sept. 26 at her home in the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx, New York. She was 104. Her death was confirmed by her daughter and only immediate survivor, Pamela Tytell. Pearl Tytell worked with her husband, Martin, at their typewriter repair and rental business on Fulton Street in Lower Manhattan, which branched out into the scientific examination of documents in the early 1950s. A rare woman in a male-dominated field, Pearl Tytell ran that end of the business and trained her son, Peter, a widely known examiner of documents until his death last year. Pearl Tytell was an expert witness for the federal government in 1982 in the tax-evasion case against the Rev.
Pearl Tytell, the matriarch of a family of questioned-document examiners whose intricate knowledge of paper, ink, handwriting and typewriters made her a prominent investigator of frauds, forgeries, tax evasion and poison-pen letters, died Sept. 26 at her home in the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx, New York. She was 104. Her death was confirmed by her daughter and only immediate survivor, Pamela Tytell. Pearl Tytell worked with her husband, Martin, at their typewriter repair and rental business on Fulton Street in Lower Manhattan, which branched out into the scientific examination of documents in the early 1950s. A rare woman in a male-dominated field, Pearl Tytell ran that end of the business and trained her son, Peter, a widely known examiner of documents until his death last year. Pearl Tytell was an expert witness for the federal government in 1982 in the tax-evasion case against the Rev.